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Hum Tv Tele film Festival May 31, 2008

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1 The tele-films accepted by ETNL for participation in the competition will be reviewed by a jury nominated by ETNL and first thirteen highest scoring entries will be selected by the jury for screening in the festival and the awards as detailed hereinafter.

2 Tele-film securing the highest points will be nominated as Golden Tele-film and will be paid an amount of Rs. 1.8 million, tele-film securing the second highest points will bevnominated as Silver Tele-film and will be paid an amount of Rs. 1.3 million, tele-film securing the third highest points will be nominated as Bronze Tele-film and will be paid an amount of Rs. 1.0 million. The remaining ten tele-films selected among the final 13 tele-films will be paid Rs. 0.6 million each as the cost of the tele-film.

3 The tele-films will also be judged by the jury nominated by ETNL for the following 11 Awards for Specific Achievements:

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Best Actor – Male
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Best Actor – Female
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Best Director
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Best Writer
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Best Supporting Actor – Male
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Best Supporting Actor – Female
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Best Debut Actor
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Best Debut Actress
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Best Cinematographer
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Best Music Score
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Best Editing

4 In addition to the aforesaid, popular Viewers‘choice Awards will be given in 3 categories: Best Tele-film, Best Actor-Male and Best Actor – Female. These awards will be chosen through viewers‘IVR/SMS.

The Award Show

http://www.zshare.net/video/1285285210cef062/

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Tera naam hatheli-PAKISTANI FILM SONG feat NOOR n SHAAN May 31, 2008

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I was watching this song on utube tera naam hatheli per likh ker usay choomti rehti hoon from pakistani movie ghar kab aao gay….

The song is beautiful, Noor luks pretty, cute n thin….she has done an awesome dance puls she is very very flexible…..shaan luks good too (well much better than wat he luks in those gujjar films)………considering this song is from a pakistani movie it showcases decency wid no vulgar or cheap steps or scenes (other songs from this movie were pretty decent too)………..

I really liked this song so thought shud share it wid u guys……….wat do u think of it ppl?

Concert and club listings May 30, 2008

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Sovereign Bank Arena

550 S. Broad St., Trenton; 609-656-3200. www.sovereignbankarena.com. Summer Beats 2008 – Atif Aslam, Kailash Kher, Richa Sharma, Amanat Ali with 40 musicians & dancers. $35-$125. Doors 7 pm. 5/31 8 pm.

Niyaz’ “Nine Heavens” on Six Degrees Records June 24 May 30, 2008

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By any measure, Niyaz has come very far, very fast. The trio’s 2005 debut featured a convincing blend of Sufi mysticism and trance electronica, and quickly established them as a standout ensemble in a very crowded world music field. A worldwide tour followed. Now, Niyaz returns with Nine Heavens, which doesn’t just cross cultural and stylistic boundaries, but the centuries as well. Drawing on medieval Persian poetry and 300-year old Persian folk songs, Niyaz has created a 21st century global trance tradition.This may seem like a tall order for a band that’s barely three years old – until you realize who these musicians are. Vocalist Azam Ali co-founded the best-selling world music duo Vas in 1996; her unmistakable voice has graced numerous recordings and major film scores. Loga Ramin Torkian is a multi-instrumentalist whose group Axiom of Choice brought the ancient sounds of Persian classical music to Western listeners in the 1990s. And producer Carmen Rizzo, a multiple Grammy nominee, has worked with Coldplay, Seal, Ryuichi Sakamoto, and many others. Small wonder then that the trio hit the ground running with its self-titled debut. Now, with Nine Heavens, Niyaz breaks new ground in a two-disc format: the first is an adventurous, spiritual exploration of the ties that bind Persian, Indian, Turkish, and Western dance music. The second is the same set of songs, in a purely acoustic setting.

Nine Heavens begins with the irresistible “Beni Beni,” which marries an 18th century Turkish Sufi poem to a traditional Turkish folk song and some beautifully integrated electronics and programming. “It’s a modern kind of Sufi music,” Azam explains. “Both Loga and I are influenced by Turkish music, and there are many connections between Turkey and Iran.” The steady, trance rhythms support layers of Turkish and Persian lutes, all topped by a new instrument known as the kamman, a larger, lower-pitched version of the traditional Persian fiddle.

Niyaz draws even more connections between Iran and India. The word niyaz means “yearning” in both Farsi, the language of Iran, and Urdu, a major language of northern India and Pakistan. Over the centuries, the cultures of Persia and India have shared not only words, but musical and spiritual traditions – and people. Azam Ali is one of them, born in Iran and raised in India; and two of the songs on Nine Heavens are by Amir Khosrau Dehlavi, a 13th-century Persian mystic and poet who was also raised in India. (The album title comes from his “Song of Nine Heavens.”) Amir Khosrau founded the style of Sufi music known as Qawwali, made famous in the recent past by the great Pakistani singer Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan, and some claim he invented the Indian tabla drums as well. But his poems, including “Molk-e-Divan” and “Sabrang,” are in the great tradition of Persian mystics like Rumi. “’Molk-e-Divan’ was the first song we wrote for the new album,” Azam says. “Loga and I found the poem and wrote the music together; he did the main melody and I did the vocal line.” Then, the whole thing was shipped off for Carmen to work his magic, which in this case consists of some highly processed drum programming and a rich tapestry of Near Eastern lutes and electronics.

Both Amir Khosrau texts can be read either as love poetry or as devotional songs to God. Of course, an English-speaking audience may be more likely to respond to the songs’ earthy, throbbing rhythms. That’s fine with Niyaz; Azam Ali points out that the sacred nature of the texts makes them a surprisingly good fit for Western dance music. “The common thread is putting yourself in a higher state. Even with club music, I think that’s what people go to it for. The only problem was that it was void of “soul,” the spirit of acoustic trance music. We always felt there was a way to bring the two together that blurs the line between the acoustic and the electronic.” A good example is the song “Tamana,” an 18th century Urdu poem that unfolds over a slow opening – much like the slow alap section of a raga performance. The electronic drones give way to the silvery tone of the Turkish cumbus, a type of lute, and as with a raga performance, the energy builds with the addition of percussion – in this case, both tabla and programmed beats. “We’ve been working so long now that this sort of fusion happens on a more intuitive level,” Loga adds. “The steady rhythm of the tabla blends naturally with the dance grooves – it just makes sense.”

So what about that “unplugged” disc? “It wasn’t intentional,” Azam recalls. “As it was coming together, we felt we had a real gem with the acoustic sessions. After we finished mixing both versions, we realized it would be a shame not to let people hear them.” The result is a rare opportunity to get inside the music, as the acoustic versions reflect the songwriting talents and mystical leanings that Azam and Loga bring; then the “final” versions showcase the organic way Carmen’s electronics fit both the rhythms and the mood of these deeply-rooted works.

Other highlights of Nine Heavens include “Iman,” a lullaby written by Loga and Azam for their infant son. Essentially a musical prayer, it offers a pause in the album’s rush of rhythmic excitement. And “Feraghi – Song of Exile” is close to the hearts of the two Persian migrs, now living in California. At a time when most Americans have a distorted view of Iran and Iranian culture, Niyaz have been doing workshops to raise awareness of the contributions of Iranians in the US and of Persian culture in general. “Our Iranian identity is important,” Loga says. “On the first Niyaz album, we were just trying to find our place here. Now, with this second record, the Persian elements are used with more confidence.” For example, “Feraghi” uses a Persian 5-beat rhythm, which most Americans would find difficult to dance to – but the blend of traditional and programmed beats is so persuasive that many would try.

Dance or trance – the music that Niyaz makes on Nine Heavens can serve either purpose. “The function of music in society has changed,” Loga points out. “It’s very different from one or two decades ago; people now listen on iPods, or in their cars; music is not their primary focus. There’s not as much sitting and listening to music. So the goal is for the music to stand on its own in different contexts.”

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Indian, Pakistani Singers in Hot ‘Summer Beats’ Show May 30, 2008

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By SONAL S LADVA
Special to India-West

LONG BEACH, Calif. — Indian and Pakistani music stars Atif Aslam, Kailash Kher, Richa Sharma and Amanat Ali headlined the “Summer Beats” concert at the Terrace Theater May 24, as a frenzied crowd of nearly 3,000 swayed to their latest pop hits, some from films and others from the stars’ signature solo releases.

Super Entertainment presented the show, which kicked off with an appearance by emcee Archana Mahajan, who set the pace with performances of the songs “Sajna diwani” and “Yeh ishq hai, jannat dikhye.”

Amanat Ali, the 20-year-old music whiz who came in third on “Sa Re Ga Ma Pa Challenge 2007,” had the young girls in the audience screeching in delight with a version of “Mitwa” from “Kabhi Alvida Naa Kehna” and renditions of other Shah Rukh Khan hits from “Kuch Kuch Hota Hai” and “Om Shanti Om.” At one point, the girls’ screams even drowned out his vocals, as the slender young singer turned in an energetic and charming performance.

Invision or Vbulletin? May 30, 2008

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Dear members,

We will be launching an entertainment forum for all the Pakistanis very soon.

Just want to ask if you can tell us which board is comfortable for you?

Invision or VBulletin.

Email ur response at lollywoodhungama@gmail.com

Thanks.

Drama Serial Yeh Zindagi Hai by Saud & Javeria May 29, 2008

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Drama Serial Yeh Zindagi Hai by Saud & Javeria

Is this a new drama? when will it come on air in USA does anyone know?

Aik kahaani new teli film May 29, 2008

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aik kahaani new teli film

http://www.zshare.net/video/12744409cf835455/

Which Pakistani Classic movie your are looking? May 29, 2008

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Which Pakistani Classic movie your are looking?
give the name

‘Pakistanis love Indian TV shows’ May 29, 2008

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Yasir Shah (TOI Photo)
You thought tear-jerking saas-bahu soaps on Indian telly had no takers?

Think again. If Karachi rampscorcher and now actor Yasir Shah has to be believed, then urban Pakistanis are completely bowled over by Indian soaps.

The dashing model, who made his small screen debut in India in a Balaji soap Khwaish, had no problems about being part of a woman-oriented show. When you have an Ekta Kapoor show as a launchpad, says Yasir, life becomes “easier”. “The two things most urban Pakistanis simply adore are Indian TV shows and Shah Rukh Khan,” adds the dashing actor.

A month after the eight-month old show wrapped up, Yasir didn’t lose heart. After a brief holiday in Pakistan, he’s back doing what he insists is now a passion, “acting”. Yasir returns in an important role in Jiya Jale (9X). Unlike his last telly outing, where he played the spoilt rich brat, in this new show, Yasir essays the role of a “lawyer with a mission”. The one common streak in the two shows (Khwaish and Jiya Jale), Yasir plays the arrogant and confident young man’s role to the hilt. By his own admission, the real Yasir is “emotional, modest and down-to-earth”.

So, does that mean Yasir has deserted mentor Ekta for a newer production house? The actor is quick to retort: “I am open to working with every production house. Although, I had no contract with Ekta’s company, I have taken her consent before taking on my new assignment. In fact, I am thankful to her for encouraging and giving a Pakistani actor like me the opportunity and platform to showcase my talent.”

Yasir also confesses that movies are not on his platter right now. “I am very satisfied with my work and I love it,” adding that given a film like his all-time favourite Rang De Basanti to do, he just might “think” about it.

What has it been like working in India? How receptive is the entertainment industry? “Indian entertainment industry is the second largest in the world. So the opportunites are much better. When it comes to professionalism, Indians score very high.

So, coming back to work here is always a pleasure,” he says. A catwalker who’s done most of the top fashion shows in Pakistan, Yasir’s foray in glambiz was expected. “Back home in Pakistan, I am a very successful and busy model. When Ekta was looking at some top names for her show, a PR company suggested my name. The rest as they say, is history,” he grins.

Have Indians been helpful? “I have found most Indians I have interacted with as very, very warm. I want to be part of the peace process in India. I want India and Pakistan to resolve all differences and share a warmer bond. I think Pakistanis and Indians are one people divided by geographical boundary. We connect so well with each other,” points out Yasir on an emotional note.

Given that he flaunts fab abs and has good looks to die for, are there women in his life? “I did like some one but she was already committed to some one else. The other girl I am working with now is too young for me,” he admits.

That must be great news for those of you who’ve been charmed by this new small screen posterboy!